Great Blogging…..Great low cost Marketing: 5 ways to Connect the dots

A lot has been written (blogged and flogged) about what is blogging, the benefits of blogging, leveraging blogging for building your brand (self and/or business), share ideas etc. With this article, I am not venturing into that space, instead I would like to share my experience of blogging where the rubber hits the road. I have distilled 5 key takeaways from my experience and my discussions with other bloggers on Linked in (viz. Rob, Vicki and Roland)

What is obvious?

Blogging is a quick way to publish content on your personal or corporate blog site and topic, which typically reaches your followers/viewers in a flash, and they can then come have conversations around the topic, thus enhancing/building on the original idea. Blogging has opened up creating and sharing content to almost anybody who can write. Its THE place to share your ideas, opinions, findings, etc.

So what’s the difference between a normal web site page and a blog?

Normal web site pages are typically static, simply stating facts, have a more enduring value as they stand and don’t really warrant an open conversation around them. E.g. product features, business case studies, price sheets, calculators, etc. These reflect the corporate offering and is akin to the shop window.

On the other hand, Blogs are dynamic, they flow with the thoughts of the author. A blog on any subject is a live active document, which is “continually” and “consistently” updated and maintained. Means that a successful blog is one, which is not a one thought wonder (like a one song wonder). Instead it exhibits thought leadership i.e. not just quality but also consistency of output and meaningful conversations (like this one), which then becomes a source of continuous learning for the reader/audience. Its like a build up towards a goal.

So what kind of articles constitute a blog?

I’ve been thinking that no matter what the subject, and presentation style or technology used, I feel the content of a blog can fall into the following framework of categories:

  • INFORMATIVE: The blog simply shares some knowledge, news, report, statistics etc. Reports on what has already happened.
  • ANALYTICAL: Author presents some insight, some reflection, some opinion on some aspect of the subject. This type of writing is typically to get feedback and build on some idea.
  • PRESCRIPTIVE: Author presents a ready made distilled list of actionables, which stems from the authors experience and observation. This will typically have the structure like “10 ways to increase sales”, “10 things to avoid when presenting to an investor”, etc.
  • INQUIRY: Author presents a question or a method and is requesting for feedback from the community to build on that idea. Note that this is different from Analytical writing since here the author has no opinion but just a question. Analogy is “thinking aloud”, “I need help with this problem, let me ask my community”, etc.

I feel that a good productive discussion around a subject will have a healthy mix of posts, which are of the above types and promote a dialog among the community and is not just a monologue or discourse by the author.

What should I watch out for, while blogging?

Note that your writings are direct reflection of who you are and what you stand for. If you stand for multiple things, its a good idea to have multiple topics in your blogs section. e.g. animal  welfare, business systems automation, etc. I would  advice against mixing up your posts across topics, since that leads to a weakening of the build up of value in that topic. Besides the obvious dos and donts, it may be a good idea to establish a “house style guide”, which is important for branding. Surely you want a sharp associatable brand and not some loose collection of disconnected threads that appears like a hair ball (blogging for the sake of blogging). Hence the posts require a style and content “coherence” and “quality” if “You have to KEEP ATTENTION, ENGAGE in discussion, LEAD in discussion, and INFLUENCE (as Roland aptly stated).”

Who can blog?

Anyways, now that we have a “prescription” for how great blogging can be used for effective and low cost “marketing”, how does one actually execute on this prescription? Given that all the good intentions are there 🙂

I feel that great blogging requires a context. People in deep touch with the context should be a helm of this activity. Also this is possible only by putting adequate time and energy to analyse, write and produce quality documents for consumption by the readers. Writing is not a trivial activity. Its akin to writing great software code.

Honestly I have been struggling with this. I tend to get so caught in operations that I become a “victim” of my “own busy ness” and I keep postponing the writing activity. While we have established that great blogging and great conversations, is the lowest cost way to attract visitors, build communities and translate a portion of them to buyers for your services, then why don’t I do it consistently (at the risk of the business loss)? I observe that sometimes the gap between my blog posts can be from 1 week to 4 weeks. I can continue to make excuses or on deeper reflection I discover that its probably that I haven’t connected to the importance of this activity OR that when there isn’t much activity around my  blog, I lose interest and get working on something more tangeable.

What is your reason for not tapping the keyboard today?

What is my response to the slow pace of blogging?

I am learning to see that this activity is at a higher level and needs my personal time and attention (its about context). I am learning that while operations can be outsourced, creative writing cannot. I am learning to overcome this by understanding that all good practices need patience and time to get established. I also realise the need to relax and just be at it consistently improving my output. I am also learning to give this due importance and “dedicating” an uninterrupted portion of my day to work on writing, sharing and connecting with other like minded people.

Any thoughts on this thought?

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